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Restitution window established for American Beauty Academy alumni


LANCASTER, Pa .– It has been about three and a half years since the American Beauty School of Lancaster closed its doors. The ramifications of this if …

LANCASTER, PA — It’s been about three and a half years since the American Beauty School of Lancaster closed its doors.

The ramifications of this situation are still being felt.

“This hit that we took with the American Beauty Academy has been devastating for a lot of people,” said Ila McKee, a former student of American Beauty Academy in Lancaster.

The academy abruptly closed in November 2015 following withholding of Title IV funds by the US Department of Education.

The for-profit aesthetic, cosmetology and barbering school reportedly misled students into believing they would have a long Thanksgiving break that year when it actually closed for good.

McKee, 36, was about halfway through the program, investing 600 hours in the cosmetology program, when it closed.

She has said so far that she has faced over $ 10,000 in student loan debt since her stint at American Beauty Academy in Lancaster.

“For adults like me who are in their thirties or late twenties, entering their forties, this is the time when you want to start establishing roots and you can’t do it when you have loads of debt. studies and ABA just kind of helping crush a lot of people’s dreams without being held responsible, ”McKee said.

The Pennsylvania Attorney General’s Office announced a colony in which the school and its owner agreed to pay $ 8,788.09 in damages and costs to two former students.

In a press release, it says, “A consumer, Saundra Rollason, of Susquehanna Township, paid the school $ 6,212.50 for hours of instruction for her granddaughter that she never did. received. In addition, she bought a kit for the education of her granddaughter which was only half supplied by Rollason and filed a complaint in the hope of recovering $ 6,787.50 in damages.

“I paid thousands of dollars to the American Beauty Academy in the hope that it would keep its promises to give my granddaughter a quality education,” Rollason said. “Instead, they cheated on us and cheated our money – and my granddaughter didn’t receive the certification she was promised. I am grateful to the Attorney General’s Consumer Protection Office for holding the school accountable and working to get our money back.

The attorney general’s office is opening a 60-day window for former students to file a claim to see if they are eligible to receive restitution.

“The sudden closure of the American Beauty Academy left students in limbo about their future and stole the hard-earned money they paid in hopes of receiving an education in return,” Pennsylvania Attorney General said , Josh Shapiro. “I encourage anyone who has been harmed by the closure of the American Beauty Academy to file a complaint within the 60 day return period. My Bureau of Consumer Protection will continue to work hard to hold for-profit schools accountable when their business practices don’t cut it off for the students they are meant to serve.

McKee, who has said she will pursue a claim, is calling on former students of the American Beauty Academy to “speak up” about the hardships caused by its unexpected shutdown.

“It’s a trade, it’s a skill. A lot of people, either you have it or you don’t. You are going to pay thousands of dollars to learn it and then you were denied your education and you’re still in debt? I think anyone would be upset, ”McKee said.

In order to determine if a student is eligible, they should file a complaint with the Attorney General’s Consumer Protection Office and contact the Attorney General’s office.

Attorney General’s Office says students can file a complaint with the Consumer Protection Bureau at http://www.attorneygeneral.gov or contact the Bureau of Consumer Protection at 800-441-2555 or [email protected]



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